Black Diamond police, community lauded by woman with stalled car

“I had to share this… because I wanted to shine a light on all of the people who contributed to my well-being in having a safe car.”

Sientje Morris and Black Diamond Sgt. Brian Lynch during a recent traffic stop where Lynch helped Morris get her car towed and repaired — all at no cost to her. Photo courtesy Black Diamond Police Department

Sientje Morris and Black Diamond Sgt. Brian Lynch during a recent traffic stop where Lynch helped Morris get her car towed and repaired — all at no cost to her. Photo courtesy Black Diamond Police Department

It’s not often someone would describe being pulled over as divine intervention. But, then again, it’s not every day when an entire police department chips in to help a driver in need.

Sientje Morris, a Buckley resident who works in Maple Valley, was driving home on Oct. 18 at around 6 p.m. when her battery light came on and her car started to stall.

“Since I was in a hurry to get home so my car wouldn’t stop, I didn’t notice I was speeding,” Morris said to the Black Diamond City Council during their Nov. 4 meeting; she was invited to speak as a guest of Mayor Carol Benson. “Sgt. Brian Lynch of the Black Diamond Police Department immediately pulled me over.”

But as he was taking her information, Morris’ car went kaput, leaving her stranded two cities away from home.

“At this point, Sgt. Brian Lynch and his partner… began to do above and beyond what any officer is required to do. They tried to jump start my car. However, that was unsuccessful,” she continued. “Since this was so, both officers stopped both sides of on-going traffic to get my vehicle and myself across the street safely to leave there overnight until I could figure out what to do. Sgt. Brian then offered to take me home, to which he did safely. I was so extremely happy, grateful, and thankful to the Lord that Sgt. Brian had pulled me over.”

Even though Morris was now safe at home, she still had to figure out how to retrieve and fix her car.

Lynch, though, had other ideas.

“The very next day, Sgt. Brian gave me a call and told me that he shared with Chief of Police, Jamey Kiblinger, and the officers of the Black Diamond Department what had happened the night before,” Morris said. “He then went on to say that the men and women of the department and the locals of the city decided to all chip in and help on my behalf, in my time of need, at no expense to me.”

In the end, Royal Towing moved the car, Black Diamond Automotive provided a free alternator, and Black Diamond Auto Plus agreed to fix the car, also for free; when the work was completed, Sgt. Lynch picked up Morris from her Buckley residence to bring her back to the Black Diamond police HQ, where her vehicle was waiting.

“As you can imagine, I was very surprised, shocked, and of course, I cried,” Morris said. “Never did I think this would happen.

“For the community to come together in such a valuable and loving way for just one person (myself) helps me realize that despite all the ugliness we may see in the news and media… love and kindness is much stronger than fear and hate,” she continued. “I had to share this with you because I wanted to shine a light on all of the people who contributed to my well-being in having a safe car.”

In a short statement, Lynch said he did not believe he acted “above and beyond” his duties.

“I do feel like this is what we, as police officers, are here to do. We help people,” he continued. “When I met Morris, I saw someone that needed help, and I knew that I had the ability to somehow make her situation better. I would want someone to help me out if I were in that same predicament.”


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