Complaints bring resident to city’s attention

The Buckley Police Department maintains city resident Calvert Bush has been an irritant for the better part of a decade.

  • Tuesday, November 18, 2008 8:00pm
  • News

The Buckley Police Department maintains city resident Calvert Bush has been an irritant for the better part of a decade.

Bush and the assorted automobiles he keeps on his property were the hot topic during the Oct. 28 gathering of the Buckley City Council.

“Mr. Bush and the collection of cars and trucks gathered in his yard on the corner of Mill and Division streets have drawn countless complaints and constituted an eyesore and a health hazard to his neighbors,” Police Chief Jim Arsanto told the council. “This has been an ongoing problem since I first became police chief.”

Arsanto added that noncompliance with the city code is a common problem, but is usually settled by knocking on culprits’ doors and asking that vehicles be parked legally.

“We are pioneering new ground here…and don’t worry, we will soon streamline this entire procedure,” Arsanto said.

The chief thanked Bush for removing the rambling blackberry bushes from his property, but insisted on Bush’s full compliance on the automobile issue.

Bush appeared less than agreeable.

After Councilman Ron Weigelt acknowledged that Bush had moved a few of the bulldozers and trucks that had formerly been entangled in blackberry vines, he wondered aloud how long the bevy of vehicles would stay off the property.

“I don’t know where I’ll move them to next,” Bush replied. “You’re a Buckley resident, aren’t you? Maybe I’ll just go ahead and park them in front of your home.”

Bush told the council he works nearly 80 hours a week and wishes that he had all the free time the council seemed to have, “ worrying about some guy parking his licensed and running vehicles in his yard.”

Mayor Pat Johnson intervened and told Bush that the majority of the individuals on the council have full-time jobs in addition to performing their civic roles.

Johnson reminded Bush he had become an issue only due to the number of complaints lodged by his neighbors.

At the end of the hour long hearing, council members noted that Bush has until their Dec. 9 meeting to comply with the existing ordinance.

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