Image courtesy Public Health Insider

Image courtesy Public Health Insider

Everyone 12 and older now eligible for Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

Although fewer children have been sick with COVID-19 compared to adults, children can be infected with the virus, get sick, and spread the virus to others.

  • Thursday, May 13, 2021 9:21am
  • News

The following is a press release from the Washington State Department of Health:

The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) has expanded COVID-19 vaccine eligibility to everyone 12 and older following recommendations that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is safe and extremely effective for 12 to 15-year-olds.

On Monday, May 10, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted an emergency use authorization (EUA) amendment to expand the Pfizer vaccine to people 12 years and older. Tonight, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and Western States Scientific Safety Review Workgroup voted to recommend the vaccine for immediate use.

“Expanding eligibility to this younger age group protects our children and gives families peace of mind. It is the best step we can take as parents to ensure our kids remain in the classroom, can safely spend time with friends, and take part in sports and extracurricular activities,” said Umair A. Shah, MD, MPH. “Research continues to show this vaccine is safe and I am thrilled it is now an option for parents and their young teens.”

The two-dose vaccine has been authorized for people 16 and older since December. In March, Pfizer announced findings from its vaccine trial which found the vaccine to be safe and 100 percent effective for kids as young as 12. The company reported the vaccine produced an antibody response in children that exceeded those in earlier trials of older teens and young adults.

Although fewer children have been sick with COVID-19 compared to adults, children can be infected with the virus, get sick, and spread the virus to others. Most children with COVID-19 have mild symptoms or have no symptoms at all. However, some children can get severely ill and may require hospitalization, intensive care, or a ventilator to help them breathe. In rare cases, children can die.

COVID-19 vaccine side effects generally mirror those experienced by adults, which may include sore arm, fatigue, or headache. Families that have questions about the vaccine are encouraged to reach out to their child’s health care provider to determine the best option for them. Those under age 18 may need consent from a parent or guardian to get the vaccine, unless they are legally emancipated.

To schedule an appointment, visit Vaccine Locator, which shows nearby providers and lists vaccine type. When scheduling an appointment for someone 12 to 17, make sure the location you choose administers the Pfizer vaccine, which is the only vaccine currently authorized for people that age. If you have questions or need help scheduling an appointment, call the state’s new COVID-19 vaccination number 833-VAX-HELP. Language assistance is available.

In addition to this expansion, Pfizer recently announced it plans to seek authorization for its vaccine for 2 to 11-year-olds this fall, and for children 6 months to 2 years old at the end of 2021. Earlier this month the company applied for full FDA approval of its COVID-19 vaccine, which would make Pfizer the first COVID-19 vaccine in the U.S. with this distinction. The FDA is expected to take several weeks to review the application.




Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@courierherald.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.courierherald.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 500 words or less.

More in News

The Blues Brothers was one of the acts to grace the Buckley Concert Series in 2019. The 2020 concert series was canceled due to the pandemic. This year, the Blues Brothers will not be making an appearance during the series. Photo by Kevin Hanson
Free and outdoors, summer concerts set for Enumclaw, Buckley

Rock n’ roll, blues, jazz and more coming July, August

King County logo
Auditors find racial disparities in King County contracts

BIPOC-owned businesses earn contract bids at a much lower rate than white-owned businesses.

Blotter bug
Black Diamond police blotter | May 24 – 30

Vehicle prowls, a civil standby and burglary

Enumclaw High senior Meredth Petellin with her award-winning piece of art, "Liberty and Justice." Photo by Ray Miller-Still
EHS artist named winner of annual OSPI art contest

Senior Meredith Petellin made her piece, “Liberty and Justice” as a way to wrap her mind about police brutality and the BLM movement.

Colette Sweers, left, and her boyfriend Trevor Curley spent part of their day in Enumclaw June 2 shopping at The Sequel Books.
The business of reopening on the Plateau

How local shops and customers are navigating health, privacy and business

Construction expert Will Martin taking some measurement of the siding of a house in Enumclaw’s Suntop Farms. Photo by Ray Miller-Still
Class action lawsuit filed against LGI Homes in Enumclaw

Plaintiffs allege developer is responsible for “defective construction”

This scooter, along with other prizes, could be yours if you donate to Bloodworks Northwest this summer.
Donate blood, win an electric scooter, sports memorabilia

Regional non-profit Bloodworks Northwest faces a shortage of blood donations

Alyxandra Bozeman, a senior at White River High, will serve as state FFA president for the next year. Photo by Kevin Hanson
White River’s Bozeman chosen to lead state FFA for the next year

Alyxandra Bozeman officially took on her new duties last month.

Blotter bug
Black Diamond police blotter | May 16 – 23

Cat scratches on a car, stolen appliances, and several DUIs.

Most Read