Free incident locators available for Lake Tapps residents | Cascade Water Alliance

The “incident locators” are signs that hang off nearby docks that allow East Pierce Fire and Rescue to quickly find you during a lake emergency.

Take note of these signs on Lake Tapps, just in case you end up in an emergency. Image courtesy East Pierce Fire and Rescue

Take note of these signs on Lake Tapps, just in case you end up in an emergency. Image courtesy East Pierce Fire and Rescue

The following is a press release from Cascade Water Alliance:

The Lake Tapps Incident Locator Program, first launched in 2014 by East Pierce Fire and Rescue, continues to be an effective way to ensure that public safety help gets where it’s needed when time counts by placing identification numbers on lake front properties.

“This is first and foremost a public safety program,” said Chuck Clarke, Cascade Water Alliance CEO. “But the incident locators also help lake operations as well as enable residents reporting concerns and issues, milfoil and more. The program is a win-win for everyone.”

East Pierce Fire and Rescue recognized the need for identifying properties from the lake side to help callers involved in or witnessing an incident on Lake Tapps quickly and accurately give 911 dispatchers a correct location for emergency response. The agency completed the numbering of all lake front properties at that time and asked homeowners to purchase the incident locator signs. A recent review indicated the need for the program still exists.

Working together, East Pierce Fire and Rescue and Cascade will make sure all key locations around the lake are marked with incident locator signs. “This program will go a long way toward making Lake Tapps safer this summer and in the future,” said East Pierce Fire and Rescue Chief Bud Backer.

Incident locator signs are made of aluminum for low maintenance and with reflective numbers for highest visibility. Each sign comes with all necessary mounting hardware. Homeowners are encouraged to acquire a lake side incident locator sign for posting on their docks, boat houses or other highly visible location so boaters, swimmers and emergency responders can easily spot the location.

For more information visit East Pierce Fire & Rescue > Lake Tapps Incident Locator Program. To sign up to receive your free incident locator sign call 253. 447.3522 or emailcbyerley@eastpiercefire.org.

For more information on Cascade Water Alliance, visit www.cascadewater.org.

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