Military vets will get local support

Military veterans no longer have to dial the phone or trek to neighboring communities to find a sympathetic ear.

Military veterans no longer have to dial the phone or trek to neighboring communities to find a sympathetic ear.

Beginning next month, Kathy Nylen – a representative of the Washington Department of Veterans Affairs – will visit Enumclaw every Monday to help link vets in need to a variety of resources. On an appointment-only basis, she will help Plateau veterans who qualify for federal, state and county benefits.

“My goal has been to get out to the rural areas of King County,” said Nylen, who has spent the past six months shuttling between Auburn, Renton and downtown Seattle.

Beginning April 6, Nylen will be available each Monday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Enumclaw City Hall. Those wishing to schedule an appointment can call 206-473-1078 or e-mail kathyn@dva.wa.gov.

The Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs and King County Veterans Services have been partnering to serve veterans and families in King County for more than a decade. The outreach program was made possible when voters authorized a levy a couple of years ago, allocating money for programs aimed at serving veterans.

In February, WDVA received a $122,000, one-year grant from King County Housing and Community Development to identify resources to provide employment and housing services to veterans and their families in Enumclaw, Redmond, Bellevue, Issaquah, Renton, Auburn and Federal Way. The grant can be extended for up to two additional years.

Nylen said she can help veterans and their spouses with a wide range of services.

For example, she spent time last week with a vet who has been unemployed eight months. He had a solid job offer, but could not accept the position because he lacked the funds necessary to get his commercial driver’s license reissued. Nylen was able to link the vet with the right resource and the money was made available.

Some veterans, she said, simply don’t know they’re eligible for benefits. There are plenty of Vietnam-era vets, Nylen explained, who qualify for financial assistance due to health troubles stemming from exposure to Agent Orange. Benefits can range from a little more than $100 a month to perhaps $2,500, depending upon the disability.

Other support services offered through Nylen’s office include rental assistance, help with medical needs, emergency food, transportation or child care. Work-related assistance is available to cover items like work clothing, union dues, licenses or other expenses that create barriers to employment.

Nylen’s services are available to those who meet all three of the following qualifications:

• veterans of any branch of the U.S. armed forces, along with family members 18 and older, who are residents of King County;

• those with a household income less than, or equal to, 175 percent of the federal poverty level; and

• all who can demonstrate barriers to stable employment and housing.


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@courierherald.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.courierherald.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 500 words or less.

More in News

Seattle Children’s Hospital (Courtesy photo)
Seattle Children’s Hospital identifies racial disparities in infections, security response

The healthcare provider did not respond to multiple requests for data used to identify disparities.

Carpenters union members peacefully strike on Sept. 16 in downtown Bellevue (photo by Cameron Sheppard)
Carpenters union strike on pause after “illegal picketing activity”

Union spokesperson claims wildcat protestors harrassed and threatened violence.

t
Peter Rogoff to step down as Sound Transit CEO in 2022

Became CEO in 2016; search for replacement to begin

File photo/Sound Publishing
Ban on single-use plastic bags in WA begins Oct. 1

Shoppers will have the choice to pay for a reusable plastic or recycled paper bag.

Image courtesy Public Health Insider
New data dashboard tracks COVID risk for unvaccinated people | Public Health Insider

No vaccine is 100 percent protective, but unvaccinated people are 7 times more likely to catch COVID and 49 times more likely to be hospitalized.

Mount Rainier. Photo courtesy National Park Service
Rainclouds and cooler temperatures put an end to several local burn bans

Campfires are once again permitted at Mount Rainier park campgrounds.

file photo
Housing and finance insiders call for subsidized housing families can own, instead of rent

Advocates say increasing homeownership will strengthen the community, build intergenerational wealth

Becky Rush-Peet is embarking on a 500 mile journey through the Camino de Santiago this year. Photo by Alex Bruell.
Enumclaw woman starting second, longer pilgrimage after nearly dying in 2015 tree crash

Five years after being crushed by a tree, Becky Rush-Peet is going for a 500-mile walk.

The Sept. 13 Enumclaw City Council meeting was a full one, though no members of the city council, and few of the audience, actually wore masks. Screenshot
Enumclaw council returns to full force, but without masks as city breaks COVID records

Read why several council members choose not to wear a mask, even though the council is back to being fully in-person.

Most Read