New rock blasting time on I-90 east of Snoqualmie Pass

The Washington State Department of Transportation and contractor crews will close I-90 for rock blasting at a new time next week starting at 7:30 p.m.

  • Saturday, July 6, 2013 6:40pm
  • News

The Washington State Department of Transportation and contractor crews will close I-90 for rock blasting at a new time next week starting at 7:30 p.m. Crews will close the pass in both directions, east of Snoqualmie Monday, July 8 through Thursday, July 11. The pass was previously closed at 8 p.m. Crews typically blast one hour before sunset. Blasting times depend on the amount of debris that comes down and could exceed two hours.

Drivers will also experience minor delays periodically from North Bend to Ellensburg through multiple construction zones.

It’s a very busy construction season and drivers need to plan their trips ahead of time. WSDOT provides a variety of tools to navigate over I-90:

• Visit the What’s Happening on I-90 Web page for up-to-date information on construction projects, traffic impacts, travel graphs and to sign up for email updates

• Visit the Snoqualmie Mountain Pass Web page for real-time travel information and to view traffic cameras

• Check the weekly Construction Updates Web page and Traffic Web page for region-wide updates

• Tune into the Highway Advisory Radio at 1610 AM and 530 AM

• Follow us on Twitter @snoqualmiepass

• Call the I-90 construction hotline at 888-535-0738 or 511


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