Not all support city logo

A recommended long-term marketing campaign, aimed at helping Enumclaw attract outsiders’ dollars, is expected to be unveiled next week.

A recommended long-term marketing campaign, aimed at helping Enumclaw attract outsiders’ dollars, is expected to be unveiled next week.

And, when the paid consultants from Destination Development make their Monday night presentation before the City Council, it is expected that a key element of that plan will not be universally liked.

A proposed logo for the city – a small piece of artwork that would be used on everything from stationery to promotional materials and perhaps signage – had some in the community grumbling when it was discreetly displayed to members of a few key groups.

Currently, the city logo incorporates a mountain and a tree.

Destination Development’s alternative features a barn and silo, with a horse-drawn carriage in front. It ties in with the city’s goal of developing itself into a magnet for equestrian enthusiasts and turning the Enumclaw Expo Center into a horse-friendly complex rivaling any in the region.

Those who have complained about the proposed logo generally believe it just doesn’t capture the essence of Enumclaw. A common theme is that emphasizing “equestrian” might be fine, but the city’s proximity to Mount Rainier shouldn’t be ignored.

“It just doesn’t say ‘Enumclaw,’” said Bev Olson, president of the Enumclaw Chamber of Commerce.

There were enough concerns expressed within the chamber membership to prompt the board of directors to conduct a survey of its members. Results of that survey will be shared during Monday’s council meeting. It begins at 7:30 at City Hall, 1339 Griffin Ave.

The city has not gone entirely public with the logo, preferring that it be kept largely under wraps until it can be displayed in the proper context. Monday’s meeting is expected to have Destination Development presenting a “style guide” that shows how the city can best use its new logo and other elements of a tourism plan.

Mayor John Wise and other city leaders point out that no logo would satisfy all segments of the community.

“You can’t please everyone,” Wise said, noting that the logo is meant to market the Expo Center as a destination for visitors. Once visitors are here, Wise said, efforts will certainly be made to direct them through all parts of the community.

Wise supports the logo proposed by Destination Development, citing the company’s history of working with communities to enhance their tourism trade. “They’ve done thousands of logos‚“for communities of all sizes, he said.

Wise is a fan of the logo.

“I like it. It’s sharp and it’s clear,” he said, adding that it sets Enumclaw apart from others in the region, especially those who market the mountain as a reason for visiting.

“Ours is not the same as theirs,” he said. “I guarantee it.‚Äù

Reach Kevin Hanson at khanson@courierherald.com or 360-802-8205.


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