State Parks collecting oral histories about Mount St. Helens eruption | Washington State Parks

Share a memory of the eruption 39 years ago for future generations.

  • Friday, September 27, 2019 3:57pm
  • LifeNews
State Parks collecting oral histories about Mount St. Helens eruption | Washington State Parks

To commemorate next year’s 40th anniversary of the Mount St. Helens eruption, Washington State Parks is looking for people who were affected by this major event in Washington state’s history.

Over the next few months, staff from the Mount St. Helens Visitor Center will spearhead an effort to collect stories from current and past residents, as well as from individuals near and far who were affected by the volcano’s eruption on May 18, 1980.

“We want to record these poignant memories before they are lost or forgotten,” said Alysa Adams, Visitor Center interpretive specialist. “You can pick up a historic newspaper or read a book about the eruption, but first-hand encounters from community members paint the real picture of that day. These voices need to be heard to preserve this part of history.

People have several options for sharing their Mount St. Helens stories:

The Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture (MAC) in Spokane is conducting a parallel effort to capture stories from Eastern Washington residents who were affected by the ash from the 1980 eruption. Some of these memories will be displayed at the museum next year. State Parks and MAC may share stories collected between the facilities.parks.state.wa.us/245/Mount-St-Helens




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