WDFW officials to discuss wolf management Oct. 7 in Colville | Department of Fish and Wildlife

The public will have an opportunity to discuss wolf management activities in northeast portion of the state with Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) leaders during a meeting Tuesday, Oct. 7, in Colville.

The public will have an opportunity to discuss wolf management activities in northeast portion of the state with Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) leaders during a meeting Tuesday, Oct. 7, in Colville.

The meeting will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. in the Colville Ag Trade Center at the Northeast Washington Fairgrounds, 317 West Astor Ave.

WDFW officials will provide information on recent wolf attacks on livestock in the region, and on the packs involved in those incidents – the Huckleberry pack in Stevens County and the Profanity Peak pack in Ferry County.

Meeting participants will be able to share their views on wolf management and recovery and to ask questions of WDFW Director Phil Anderson, Eastern Regional Director Steve Pozzanghera, and other department staff.

WDFW actions this summer to protect sheep from the Huckleberry pack are described in a question-and-answer document on the department’s website.

More recently, WDFW officials confirmed that wolves were responsible for killing a cow and calf at a cattle grazing site in Ferry County, within the range of the newly discovered Profanity Peak pack. WDFW wildlife conflict specialists continue to monitor that situation.

In 2011, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed gray wolves from the federal list of endangered species in the eastern third of the state, but the species is still protected under Washington state law. The state Wolf Conservation and Management Plan and state laws set the parameters for responding to wolf predation on livestock.

The department has also established a Wolf Advisory Group that provides input to the department on wolf plan implementation. More information on that group is available on WDFW’s website.

 


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