Don Brunell

People in glass houses | Don Brunell

There’s an old saying that people living in glass houses shouldn’t throw rocks. The moral is that before criticizing others, you should make sure your own house is in order. Companies, such as REI, supporting Gov. Inslee’s climate change legislation should heed that advice.

Connecting the dots… | Don Brunell

How is Seattle’s Lighthouse for the Blind connected to the Export-Import Bank? Very closely. Since 1918, The Lighthouse for the Blind has provided education, training and manufacturing jobs for people with visual and hearing disabilities. Of the 400 people currently employed there, approximately 240 are blind or deaf-blind.

Big ships are bringing big waterfront changes | Don Brunell

The Longshoremen’s work slowdown that snarled west coast ports for nine months is over, leaving behind bitter memories and billions in economic damages. But the global trends that foreshadowed that port disruption remain.

Trade promotion imperative for America | Don C. Brunell

To many, giving President Obama more authority is a bad idea. However, regardless of how you feel about him, the President of the United States needs the power to negotiate trade agreements.

Trade promotion imperative for America | Don Brunell

To many, giving President Obama more authority is a bad idea. However, regardless of how you feel about him, the President of the United States needs the power to negotiate trade agreements.

Washington’s tax freedom day comes later than usual | Don Brunell

Will you celebrate Tax Freedom Day this year? Until April 24, every penny we’ve earned in 2015 goes to pay your taxes.

Showdown in Seattle over city’s minimum wage law | Don Brunell

Ever since the $15 wage proposal was narrowly approved by City of SeaTac voters, municipal leaders in neighboring Seattle have pushed to impose the same edict.

Fossil fuels aren’t going away soon | Don Brunell

Folks in the Pacific Northwest may not like what Matt Ridley has to say, but we should consider his points about energy.

Higher minimum wage misses the target | Don Brunell

Washington has the nation’s highest minimum wage at $9.47 an hour and now the state legislature wants to hike it to $12. Seattle Mayor Ed Murray (D) wants to boost it to $15 to go in step with the SeaTac initiative, which voters barely approved last year.

Can Washington avert California’s water wars? | Don Brunell

California is in the midst of a fierce water war, a conflict that holds lessons for us in Washington State. In many ways, we are alike. Both of our states’ populations are growing and we have some of the world’s most prolific agriculture regions which require lots of water. Washington is served by a vast network of storage reservoirs that make up the Columbia River drainage. It stretches from the northern Canadian Rockies to as far south as Wyoming.

Can Washington avert California’s water wars? | Don Brunell

California is in the midst of a fierce water war, a conflict that holds lessons for us in Washington State. In many ways, we are alike. Both of our states’ populations are growing and we have some of the world’s most prolific agriculture regions which require lots of water. Washington is served by a vast network of storage reservoirs that make up the Columbia River drainage. It stretches from the northern Canadian Rockies to as far south as Wyoming.

North-South battle for Seattle fliers | Don Brunell

The fierce competition between Seattle’s Alaska Airlines and Atlanta’s Delta Airlines is spilling over to the Port of Seattle, and it may reach your wallet in the form of higher airfares. The Port commission, which manages Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, must decide whether to build a new international arrivals terminal at the south end of the airport or expand the north satellite to accommodate additional domestic flights.

Obama on wrong track with Alaska energy | Don C. Brunell

In his State of the Union address, President Obama highlighted plunging gas prices. Ironic, since Obama has done everything in his power to curtail domestic oil production and drive up gas prices.

A leftist leader with the right idea | Don Brunell

Can you imagine a nation’s president, a former guerilla fighter with socialist leanings, enacting policies that favor business and encourage foreign investment? How about a leaderwho prefers living in a farmhouse rather than the presidential mansion? That person is José Mujica, the 79-year old president of Uruguay who finishes his five-year term in March. Uruguay, a small South American country sandwiched between Argentina and Brazil, does not allow a president to stand for reelection, so later this spring, Mujica will take a seat in the senate.

Sedro Woolley company bringing space age technology down to Earth | Don Brunell

Designers of the International Space Station (ISS) had to make it self-sustaining because, once aboard, astronauts had no way to get water or discharge sewage and no connection to Earth’s power grids.

Making college affordable is vital to America | Don Brunell

When my parents graduated from high school in 1936, a college education was too expensive for the son of a copper miner and the daughter of a plumber.Eighty years ago, our country was in the middle of the Great Depression and teens took odd jobs to help put food on the table and pay the family bills. In those days, no bank would lend money to college students.

Is Boeing having second thoughts about moving to Illinois? | Don Brunell

In 2001, Boeing announced it would move its corporate headquarters from Seattle to Chicago. Today, you wonder if Boeing is having buyer’s remorse.

Counting our blessings | Don Brunell

It’s that time of year when we count our blessings. In America, they are abundant, especially this year. For starters, the unemployment rate is down from 7 percent last December to 5.8 percent. Washington State mirrors the national average.

Remembering our fallen with Christmas wreaths | Don Brunell

Christmas is a difficult time for anyone grieving for a lost loved one. It is especially painful for America’s military families whose son, daughter, spouse or parent was killed in action this year.

Give charter schools a chance in Washington | Don Brunell

Hurricane Katrina devastated the gulf coast in 2005, flooding cities and towns in four states and killing more than 1,800 people. The government response to Katrina, especially by FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency), became the poster child for an inept and incompetent bureaucracy. But out of this disaster has come a story of success. The hurricane gave New Orleans educators the opportunity to reinvent the city’s failing public schools.