Becker Building to bring medical specialists to area

The goal behind the newly-built Becker Medical Building is to bring more specialists into the Enumclaw area and with owner Dr. Nancy Becker taking the lead and Cardio Consultants following, reality is taking shape.

  • Tuesday, December 9, 2008 4:41am
  • Business

Dr. Nancy Becker (middle

The goal behind the newly-built Becker Medical Building is to bring more specialists into the Enumclaw area and with owner Dr. Nancy Becker taking the lead and Cardio Consultants following, reality is taking shape.

The three-story building has been a long process for Becker, who purchased her first piece of property at the 1427 Jefferson St. location, a little house, in 1993 and made it home to Ears, Nose and Throat, Allergy Therapy and Facial Plastic Surgery. Through the years, Becker continued to purchase property. The community watched as houses were moved to other neighborhoods and the area next to the hospital began to take shape.

It’s been a six-year process from the first architectural drawings to the building’s opening in early November.

And as is the mantra for real estate – location, location, location – Becker notes the location, across the street from Enumclaw Regional Hospital, is perfect for specialists.

“I’m very excited,” Becker said.

Becker, who makes her home in Enumclaw, was born and raised in Auburn and graduated from Auburn High School. She graduated with honors from Stanford University, went to medical school in Los Angeles,= and did her residency training in Ears, Nose, Throat, Facial Plastic Surgery in Detroit. She came back to join her father in practice in 1991 in Auburn. He had performed surgery and covered the emergency room in Enumclaw.

It was only natural, Becker said, that she should come out and practice in Enumclaw.

She is board certified in ears, nose and throat and facial plastics. She is also fellowship trained in allergy.

The Becker Medical Building is also home to the Becker Hearing Center which Becker hopes will help the Plateau population who need hearing aids and hearing aid maintance.

The Becker Hearing Center features a sound-proof booth in its audiology department that belonged to Becker’s father. There’s also a newspaper article featuring the two of them before he retired in 1993 hanging on one of the walls.

“There’s little bits of dad here,” Becker smiled.

The presence of friends and family is felt throughout the building giving it a warm feeling. In the reception lobby, one wall features a series of photographs and keepsakes from a good friend of Becker’s who is an astronaut.

The new building is Becker’s home away from home now. She once split her time between here and Auburn, but now she is concentrating her practice on Enumclaw and plans to be here a long time.

“I would love to practice forever,” Becker said. “I love what I do.”

One of the hardest parts of the change, she said, is the new phone number, 360-825-4466.

Reach Brenda Sexton at bsexton@courierherald.com or 360-802-8206.

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