Shop and give wisely | Better Business Bureau

Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday and Giving Tuesday—the holiday shopping season is here, and Better Business Bureau serving Alaska, Western Washington and Oregon is advising consumers to shop and give wisely.

  • Saturday, November 22, 2014 10:29pm
  • Business

Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday and Giving Tuesday—the holiday shopping season is here, and Better Business Bureau serving Alaska, Western Washington and Oregon is advising consumers to shop and give wisely.

According to the National Retail Federation, shoppers spent an average of $407 last year and more than 100 million consumers shopped on Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday.

While there are many bargains to be had, BBB warns of deals that are too good to be true.

  • Safety first. Anticipate traffic and be careful of crowds. Never leave a wallet, credit card or purse on a counter or in an unattended shopping cart. It is a good idea to shop with a companion or ask for a security escort to the car.
  • Don’t fall for false advertising. Some companies will resort to ads that are misleading, deceptive or fraudulent. Bait-and-switch tactics are designed to bring consumers into a store but push them toward more expensive items.
  • Check return and exchange policies. Store policies can change for Black Friday deals. Consumers should educate themselves on whether returns are possible.  Final sales, a very short return window and in-store only credits are common during the holiday shopping season.
  • Shop local. Consumers can save time and money by supporting small businesses in their community. Check neighborhood retailers for their weekend deals on Small Business Saturday, the day after Black Friday. Some stores may be able to price-match some items.
  • Beware of counterfeit sites and sales on Cyber Monday. The anonymity of the Internet often makes it difficult to discern between the legitimate and the counterfeit. Exceptionally low prices, distorted photos and missing contact information are often signs of a phony online retailer.
  • Give wisely and thoughtfully. Giving Tuesday is the first Tuesday after Thanksgiving.  Before donating to a charity, make sure it is vetted. Consumers can see a charity’s rating at BBB.org or Give.org, a website run by the Council of Better Business Bureaus.

BBB advises consumers to check a business’ rating and reviews before buying.  For more information, visit BBB.org and download BBB’s iPhone App for reviews on-the-go.

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