City promoting bluegrass festival

The Enumclaw Expo Center’s fieldhouse and stadium will explode with the sounds of bluegrass music Aug. 21, 22 and 23.

  • Tuesday, August 4, 2009 3:21am
  • Life

The Cascade Mountain Boys and Lee Highway will headline the upcoming bluegrass festival.

The Enumclaw Expo Center’s fieldhouse and stadium will explode with the sounds of bluegrass music Aug. 21, 22 and 23.

The final day, a Sunday, will feature gospel bluegrass from 10 a.m. to noon.

Some of the best bluegrass musicians from Washington and Oregon will be featured at Enumclaw’s first bluegrass festival. Headliners for the event are Oregon’s Lee Highway and Washington’s Cascade Mountain Boys. The Cascade Mountain Boys have been a patron’s favorite for recent Evenings on the Plateau performances. Lee Highway is known up and down the coast, and is another favorite of regional bluegrass festival attendees.

Lee Highway brings together five accomplished and highly respected musicians from the Northwest Bluegrass community to produce the sound of classic American bluegrass music.

The group performs a broad mix of famous bluegrass numbers drawn from the golden era of bluegrass music. From vocal duets to quartets, to the driving rhythms of the five string banjo, guitar, mandolin, fiddle and bass this group will take you back to the exciting sounds of bluegrass as performed by Bill Monroe, Flatt and Scruggs, the Stanley Brothers and more.

The Cascade Mountain Boys have proven to be an Enumclaw favorite.

The group performs high energy, hard driving, traditional Bluegrass music. Gathering around one microphone, they deliver a dynamic concert that features three-part harmony. Singer/songwriter Mike Faast is joined by Jamie Blair, banjo and vocals; Terry Enyeart, guitar and vocals; and Roger Ferguson, mandolin, fiddle and vocals, as they perform a blend of originals, bluegrass standards, and gospel music.

The city of Enumclaw is also bringing in regional bands VZ Valley Boys, Runaway Train, Country Dave and the Pickn’ Crew, Northern Departure, Urban Monroes, and a special performance by Tutmarc Brothers with vocalist Paula Tutmarc Johnson.

Tickets are available at the Enumclaw Expo Center and will also be available at the fieldhouse during the event. For information, call 360-825-3594, or contact Gary LaTurner at

Ticket Prices are $35 for the three-day event, $15 for Friday evening, $20 for Saturday and $10 for Sunday morning gospel.

Bluegrass fans can enjoy food on-site food and camping is available. Call to reserve a space.

Go to and follow the links to the headliners and more.

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