Seniors enjoy a hot meal at the Black Diamond Community Center every Tuesday and Thursday at noon. Photo by Ray Still.

Black Diamond Community Center budget slashed $40,000

Cheryl Hanson, the executive director of the Black Diamond Community Center, had some bad news for the City Council.

Cheryl Hanson, the executive director of the Black Diamond Community Center, had some bad news for the City Council.

“I’m losing $40,000 starting in January,” she announced Nov. 3.

It’s nothing the community center did to lose the money, Hanson continued. It’s that United Way of King County has decided to focus it’s donation efforts elsewhere.

“What they want to fund is great stuff,” she said. “Homeless. Mental health. Drug and alcohol. All the things that most of the people who contribute to Microsoft see when they go to work. But that cut me out.”

According to Hanson, the community center met with United Way in late 2015 to discuss funding cuts, but found out in July that funding for the senior center, a sizeable $20,000, would be cut completely.

Approximately 700 seniors are served at the senior center.

In anticipation of the cuts, the center let go two part-time staff members, and the senior lunch program is now only Tuesdays and Thursdays, and no longer held on Friday.

To make up for the reduced lunches, the center partnered with the Enumclaw and Maple Valley senior centers for Monday, Wednesday and Friday lunches, and host Enumclaw and Maple Valley seniors on the off days.

Senior field trips were also cut, and adult daycare is no longer held, but “the cut that hurt us the most was the transportation of seniors to and from the center and to their doctor appointments,” Hanson said.

“So we did take cuts, but we still help with all the essential items the seniors need like food, clothing, gas vouchers, car and home repair, rental assistance and fun filled Tuesdays and Thursday lunches,” she continued.

Hanson said she hopes that additional grants and private donations will help the community center continue these essential services, adding that the Salvation Army has already stepped up to specifically help with gas vouchers and emergency service.

The other $20,000 cut from the center was for the before and after school care program (BASK) for kindergarteners through 6th grade students.

The BASK program typically serves between 20 to 22 Enumclaw School District students every year.

However, the BASK program had to shrink already this year because the program was held was at the Black Diamond Elementary School.

The program is currently held in a smaller space at J.J. Smith Elementary, and class sizes had to be cut from 22 to 14 kids per class due to space and funding issues.

Hanson said because class sizes already had to be cut, she doesn’t anticipate the program being affected by the cuts for the remainder of year, but the program will most likely be affected by the cuts in the near future once the program can move back into Black Diamond Elementary.

The community center will still receive $10,000 from United Way for its food bank and emergency items for the general population.

WHERE DID THE MONEY GO?

When United Way’s 2015-2020 Strategic Plan was published in June 2015, it came a few changes, especially concerning seniors.

“Sometimes these 5-year plans can signal ‘business as usual’ and other times they say ‘change is needed,’” a news update from the charity reads. “This plan was more about the latter.”

According to the update and Assistant Director of Public Relations Sabrina Register, the charity had conversations with agencies about the 2015-2020 Strategic Plan back in 2015 in order to help people like Hanson prepare for the shift in funding.

“We are moving away from a wide and shallow range of services to focus our investments in areas we can make the most difference,” Register said in a Nov. 8 interview. “We’ve moved away from general senior services.”

United Way’s updated focuses for 2015-2020, Register said, are on homeless (reduce the number of unsheltered homeless by 50 percent), education and graduation (engage 50 percent of youth without a high school diploma and prepare 80 percent of kids for kindergarten) and financial stability programs (help bring 50,000 people above the poverty line).

Register said some senior services are still funded, but mainly services concerning housing and financial stability.

As for the BASK program, Register said its funds were cut because the community center did not apply to United Way’s latest Request for Proposal (RFP), since it did not fit into the overall goal of dropout prevention.

“So in this instance, we didn’t decrease their funding but rather, they decided not to apply when we changed the focus from general youth development to dropout prevention to align with our investment work of students graduate,” Register said.

INSURANCE RELIEF

Hanson appealed to the Black Diamond City Council Nov. 3 to ask for the city’s financial help.

This would not be the first time the council made room for the center in it’s yearly budget – two years ago, the council approved funding the center’s $10,000 insurance bill.

“That’s the only way we actually give back to our community center, has been the insurance program in the past,” Mayor Carol Benson said at the meeting.

Despite all the political disagreements this year, the council quickly rallied to offer support.

“I think it’s the minimum we can do to help out,” councilwoman Janie Edelman said.

“We can squeeze some more juice out of that budget,” agreed Councilman Brian Weber, who’s son recently graduated from the center’s BASK program.

A budget workshop was held on Nov. 10 to discuss adding this item to the city’s budget.

HOW TO DONATE TO THE BDCC

Hanson said she’s going to every funding source she can think of to help make up this loss in funding, but is hoping Enumclaw, Black Diamond and Maple Valley residents – since all three cities have people who come to the Black Diamond Community Center – can help as well.

Checks made out to the center, which is a 501(c)3 non-profit, can be dropped off or mailed to 31605 3rd Avenue in Black Diamond.

More in News

Abigail Hill, 19, is crowned Miss Washington by the 2017 title winner, Alex Carlson-Helo. Photo courtesy Jerry and Lois Photography
Local Miss Washington prepares for national stage

That’s right — Enumclaw is competing in Miss U.S.A. Abigail Hill, the city’s newest star, was recently crowned Miss Washington , clearing the way for her to compete nationally in the spring.

Suspect faces possible ‘third strike’ after alleged car chase, kidnapping

A suspect with a long criminal history finds himself in “third strike” jeopardy, the result of an alleged robbery in Enumclaw and ensuing car chase out of town.

Why now is a good time for a flu shot | Public Health Insider

With the holidays drawing near, many of us look forward to travel or seeing family and friends. And just as our schedules get busier, it’s also the time of year when the flu starts to circulate. We turned to Libby Page, manager of our immunizations program, to get the scoop on flu vaccine.

Election 2017: Change in Enumclaw; Buckley mayor race close

The 2017 general election is over, and although the results are still two weeks from being certified, many candidates are in the clear to take up their elected positions come winter.

Proposed recycling center sparks environmental fears

A proposed material processing facility outside of Enumclaw has some local conservationists worried about how it may affect the Green River and other natural environments. “The location of this, next to this natural area, just is not right. It doesn’t make sense to us at all, for a variety of reasons,” said Bernie McKinney, president of the Green River Coalition, a non-profit preservationist group.

Get your fill of winter activities on Mount Rainier

Mount Rainier’s landscape undergoes a dramatic transformation in winter.

Holiday shows bring out the classics, family favorites

Sumner’s two performance arts groups have a slew of holiday shows for you to enjoy.

Sumner students spent summer learning to define, defy boundaries

Four Sumner High School students explored the world of boundaries last summer when they attended the International Baccalaureate (IB) Organization’s World Student Conference in New York.

Antibiotic resistant gonorrhea found in King County | Public Health Insider

Public Health – Seattle & King County’s STD Clinic Director, Dr. Lindley Barbee, MD, MPH has found antibiotic resistance in a drug that is used to treat gonorrhea. We talked to her to find out more.

Bonney Lake, Sumner gear up for holiday festivities

Plateau holiday festivities are right around the corner.

Enumclaw, Buckley busy during the holidays

What’s going on during the holiday season on the Plateau? Here’s a list of activities you and your family may enjoy!