Final work begins this week on Buckley traffic lights

Police will be guiding traffic on state Route 410 in Buckley Feb. 14, 20, and 21, so plan accordingly.

Crews were installing new traffic lights at three Buckley intersections last week, including this one at SR 410 and Main Street. Photo by Kevin Hanson

Crews were installing new traffic lights at three Buckley intersections last week, including this one at SR 410 and Main Street. Photo by Kevin Hanson

After a delay of several months, it’s out with the old and in with the new when it comes to a trio of Buckley traffic lights. Except for one more waiting period.

It was in August of last year when the state’s Department of Transportation announced crews would be replacing the outdated signal system at the intersections of state Route 410 and three busy roads: Park Avenue, Main Street and Mundy Loss Road.

It was noted at the time that the modern signals would help improve traffic flow at intersections that saw an average of 20,000 vehicles daily. That count was in 2017 and those who travel 410 know nothing has been improved.

Contractors began work on the $2.3 million project, which was expected to be completed last fall, but soon hit a snag — the company that manufactures the steel poles to be used in the project was backlogged and supplies were not available.

Time remedied that situation and new lights were put in place last week – but covered and not in use.

DOT representative Cara Mitchell said three key dates remain on the project calendar, dates that will have an impact on Buckley traffic. As crews finish electrical work and ready the new lights for full-time use, police will be guiding traffic through the intersections between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Work will take place Feb. 14 at Mundy Loss Road, Feb. 20 at Main Street and Feb. 21 at Park Avenue.

The new lights are designed to work together to improve traffic flow. Mitchell said engineers will be working on timing issues once installation is complete.

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