Photo by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Photo by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Learn how natural yard care can protect Lake Tapps and your environment | Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department

Using less pesticides and knowing what plants keep an ecosystem healthy will be only a few of the tips and tricks taught at the free workshop.

Caring for your yard the natural way helps keep Lake Tapps beautiful and clean. Learn how at a free workshop Oct. 18, 6-8 p.m., at Island Lodge, 20818 Island Parkway E., Lake Tapps.

“Toxic algae advisories or warnings are never good news for those who live on and enjoy Lake Tapps,” said Chrissy Cooley, Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department program manager. “But nutrient runoff from yards can lead to unwanted plant and algae growth—even toxic algae. The workshop will help residents understand how they can have a beautiful yard that also protects Lake Tapps,” Cooley said.

PICK YOUR PLANTS WITH CARE

Shoreline plant choice can enhance lake water quality, preserve the views, and keep geese off lawns. What you use to cultivate your plants and lawns affects the lake. Master gardener Patty Peterson will explain the connection between your yard and the health of the lake. Learn which plants are best to keep the lake healthy.

You’ll learn about the five natural yard care principles and why they matter:

  1. Build healthy soils.
  2. Choose the right plants.
  3. Practice smart watering.
  4. Think twice before you use pesticides.
  5. Practice natural yard care.

For the second time, Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department has partnered with Cascade Water Alliance to sponsor the event. You can enter a raffle for a chance to win free plants and soil.

TO ATTEND

Reserve your spot for the workshop. Questions? Contact Tina Friedrich at tfriedrich@tpchd.org or (253) 798-4715. Learn more about our TappsWise and Natural Yard Care programs and the WSU Pierce County Master Gardener Program.

About Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department: Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department’s mission is to protect and improve the health of all people and places in Pierce County. As part of our mission, the Health Department tackles known and emerging health risks through policy, programs and treatment to protect public health. We are one of roughly 220 accredited health departments in the country and among six in the state to have met or exceeded the Public Health Accreditation Board’s quality standards. Learn more at www.tpchd.org.

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