WFDW revises wildlife interaction rules | Department of Fish and Wildlife

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission has approved revisions to rules addressing various sources of conflict between people and wildlife, such as wildlife damaging crops or harming livestock.

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission has approved revisions to rules addressing various sources of conflict between people and wildlife, such as wildlife damaging crops or harming livestock.

The commission, a citizen panel appointed by the governor to set policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), approved the changes during its meeting Nov. 13-14 in Olympia.

The revised rules relate to interactions between humans and wildlife such as deer, elk, cougars or bears. They also address reporting and permit requirements for people dealing with a wildlife conflict.

In other business, the commission approved two land transactions, including the purchase of 235 acres in Cowlitz County to protect riparian areas along Merrill Lake and the Kalama River for steelhead and bull trout habitat.

The commission also approved the purchase of 2,061 acres of riparian and high meadow lands in Asotin County. WDFW’s plan to acquire this land nearly completes a multi-phased plan to expand the department’s Chief Joseph Wildlife Area and preserve critical habitat for threatened salmon, steelhead and trout, as well as deer, bighorn sheep and elk. The department has secured state and federal funds to purchase the $3.7 million property, currently owned by 4-O Land & Livestock, LLC.

In addition, the commission received public comments on proposed changes in sportfishing rules for freshwater areas of Puget Sound and the Washington coast. The proposals cover fishing seasons, daily limits and other rules.

To review the proposed sportfishing rules, visit WDFW’s webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/rule_proposals/. The commission is schedule to take action on these proposals at its December meeting.

More in News

Black Diamond supports recall as OPMA lawsuit comes to an end

Councilwoman Pat Pepper will most likely be recalled as soon as the February special election is certified Friday, Feb. 23.

State Patrol now ticketing for E-DUIs; insurance premiums may be affected

When the law was passed last year, WSP was just giving warnings. Now, drivers will be pulled over and ticketed with an E-DUI for using electronics behind the wheel.

POM Executive Director moving on | Plateau Outreach Ministries

Britt Nelson will be leaving her position as head of the organization in June.

Local museums to participate in Pierce County history event

The Foothills Historical Museum in Buckley, the Greater Bonney Lake Historical Society, the Carbon River Corridor/Wilkeson Historical Society and the Sumner Historical Society are coming together Feb. 24.

Largest Salmonella outbreak linked to live poultry | Department of Health

There were more than 1,000 Salmonella cases nationally last year.

Bonney Lake council starts pool talks, considers forming metro parks district

The last metropolitan parks district the city asked voters to approve failed in 2013, with 80 percent of voters against it. But an energetic group of folks who want a city pool could change that in the near future.

Enumclaw Council agrees to earlier starting time

Instead of 7:30 p.m. on Moondays, the council will now meet at 7 p.m. sharp.

Enumclaw High hosts 7th annual Empty Bowls event

The event, held at Enumclaw High School, will help fund the Enumclaw Food Bank and Plateau Outreach Ministries.

Most Read