A buttermilk agenda | Our Corner

Over the next few weeks we will begin seeing declarations of candidacy for political office from many brave souls.

Over the next few weeks we will  begin seeing declarations of candidacy for political office from many brave souls.
I say “brave” because, after covering political races for far too long, I know a contested race can be one of the most stressful and scarring experiences one can go through.
First-time candidates are often taken by surprise at the vitriol spewed for a race paying virtually no money, offering no real power and very little prestige.
Politicians are open to attacks from both sides of the dais and often walk into a trap without ever looking down. Prestige is not something we offer to politicians running for office, yet the most critical citizens seldom, if ever, run. The one time I saw a high-pitched, self-appointed watchdog get elected it was a disaster of psychotic proportions.
Being vigilant in assessing and questioning candidates and their motives (or agendas) is the responsibility of voters. That is the job in a republic. A voter places someone in office who is to assess and consider the issues. After weighing the various sides, elected officials then make decisions based on their own best judgement. The job is not to simply mouth back what a constituency demands. This is known as the “I voted for you so you have to say what I want” demand. Apparently these folks slept through the republic part of civics.
I don’t think any responsible political official will ever vote down the line to please all. If an official does, he or she is little more than a populist puppet waiting for the friends in the great “community” to say which way is right…or left. 
I often hear folks tell me how the politicians are the problems in the country, state or community.
One can make that argument, but voters are part of that bargain. Our job is to listen and question and not just run everything through our “I only want to hear my side” agenda. I see nothing wrong with an agenda. We all have them, mine just happens to be buttermilk. If I could find a candidate to run on the “free buttermilk for me” platform he’d have my vote in heartbeat.
A candidate’s agenda or a voter’s agenda is not the issue or the problem. It is the ability to think outside the agenda. If a candidate’s or voter’s agenda puts them into a steel-sided labyrinth, then there is trouble.
My only observation is to listen to the candidates. Listen to their words and give them a chance to present their side. Their words will tell you what you need to know.
And please let me know if there is a buttermilk candidate out there.

More in Opinion

Trump supporters’ attitude still the same

“Support Trump? Sure,” she said. “I like him.” These words by Pam Shilling from Trump Country western Pennsylvania reflect what many Trump supporters are thinking a year after the 2016 election victory, according to an article excerpted from “Politico.com” by “The Week” (Dec. 1, 2017).

Readers note: Change in comments section

The Courier-Herald has switched to a different online reader-comments platform.

Former fan finished with disrespectful NFL players

I lived off the grid for 15 years and the one thing I missed the most was watching pro football.

Carrying firearms about to change at the state Capitol

If you come to the state Capitol and want to see lawmakers in action, there are a few rules to follow while sitting in the galleries overlooking the Senate and the House floors.

Thank you everyone who made ‘Make A Difference Day’ a success

I want to thank everyone who makes every day a “Make a Difference Day” in Black Diamond.

Seek a sense of security, purpose in our lives

Thousands of years ago, the Greeks and the Romans worshipped a pantheon of gods: Jupiter, Juno, Venus, Mercury, Artemis and Athena. If you search for a list of Greek and Roman gods, they number at least 100. These gods reflected human frailties and their strengths.

Nationwide infrastructure needed to combat Alzheimer’s

Too often Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia are treated as a normal aging issue, ignoring the public health consequences of a disease that someone in the U.S. develops every 66 seconds.

Don’t give into the pressure of driving drowsy

Eleven years ago, a drowsy-driving car wreck left me with injuries that still challenge me today.

Opening our minds can be a beautiful thing

As a leader of my church’s Sunday Adult Forum, I had a goal: to put a human face on Islam for the members of the congregation and community.

GOP has no place in small-town politics

Mission creep, according to Miriam-Webster is: “the gradual broadening of the original objectives of a mission or organization.”

Dismantling racism requires radical patience

The other day my friend, a POC (person of color), had to explain to his friend, a white woman, why using the N-word wasn’t acceptable.

Enumclaw mayor deserves a thanks for a job well done

I have always been proud to say I live in Enumclaw.