The recall effort against Black Diamond Councilwoman Pat Pepper is reaching a head, with a measure being placed on the Feb. 13 ballot. File image

The recall effort against Black Diamond Councilwoman Pat Pepper is reaching a head, with a measure being placed on the Feb. 13 ballot. File image

Black Diamond recall set for February special election

King County Communications Officer Kafia Hosh said putting the measure on the Feb. 13 ballot will cost the city around $5,000, but the full cost won’t be known until after the election.

The recall effort against Black Diamond Councilwoman Pat Pepper has been set once again.

According to Johna Thomson — secretary of Neighbor to Neighbor Black Diamond, which filed the recall charges — the Feb. 13, 2018 special election ballot will contain the recall measure.

Originally, the county scheduled the recall measure to be on a Dec. 5, 2017 ballot after Neighbor to Neighbor submitted 639 signatures supporting the measure to the county.

However, because the state Supreme Court’s Oct. 26 ruling dropped one of the four recall charges approved by the King County Superior Court on May 10, Neighbor to Neighbor had to recollect signatures.

“When the Supreme Court made a slight modification to the recall charges, we knew our original signature gathering efforts were not in vain because going back to those same voters to ask for their signatures again was easy. In fact, we collected nearly 500 signatures in less than two weeks, even though the cold, wet weather and the Thanksgiving holiday made it challenging,” Thomson said in a press release.

The group collected 496 signatures between Nov. 16 and Nov. 29.

According to state law, the city will have to pay for the cost of the recall measure.

County Communications Officer Kafia Hosh said putting the measure on the Feb. 13 ballot will cost the city around $5,000, but the full cost won’t be known until after the election.

Had the Dec. 5 special election date held, Hosh estimated the cost would have been closer to between $22,000 and $24,000. “The February election is less expensive because the cost is spread out over more jurisdictions participating in the election,” Hosh said.




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