Busy road OK’d for more housing in Enumclaw

City Council gave approval for a 16-home development off Semanski Street.

The city of Enumclaw’s housing market continues to grow, most recently with the governmental go-ahead for a 16-home development along Semanski Street.

During their Jan. 22 meeting, City Council members gave tentative approval for a parcel of land to be divided from nearly five acres to 16 residential lots. Making the request was JK Monarch Homes, which hopes to develop land sitting east of Semanski Street and south of Roosevelt Avenue.

The proposal carries the name Semanski Estates and includes road improvements, connection to the city sewer system and a stormwater disposal system.

The council passed the necessary resolution on first reading. It will return, likely at the next council meeting, for final approval.

In other action during their Jan. 22 session, members of the Enumclaw City Council:

• watched the swearing-in of the two latest Students On Council representatives. Serving this academic quarter are Mercer Akeson and Zoe Davidson, both students at Enumclaw Middle School.

They are part of a program launched in late 2016 that provides interested seventh- or eighth-graders an opportunity to see how local government functions. Students from either city middle school are eligible to apply for the program, which was spearheaded by Mayor Jan Molinaro while he was a member of the City Council.

• took the first step toward changing the starting time for regularly-scheduled meetings of the City Council.

At an earlier meeting, Councilman Hoke Overland had suggested council meetings begin at 7 p.m., rather than 7:30. His council peers agreed and asked city administration to prepare an appropriate ordinance. It was passed on first reading, will return for a final reading in February and take effect in March.

• offered a proclamation celebrating Vickie Forler, who retired Jan. 31 after a 40-year career with Enumclaw.

She began working with the city in December 1977, first as a meter reader. She advanced to become a department secretary and eventually the administrative assistant for the Public Works Department. Along the way, it was noted, she worked on a variety of programs helping both city employees and the public.

• approved a land lease with Cal-Am Properties that allows for RV parking and storage at Mt. Villa Mobile Home Park. The city-owned land had been used Mt. Villa under terms of an agreement that terminated with the close of 2013. A month-by-month lease had been in effect since that time, but both sides sought to renew a commercial lease agreement.

The new deal calls for payments of $250 per month, with a 3 percent annual increase, and runs through the end of 2022. It was noted the city has no plans for the land, which is less than one acre in size.

Final approval of the lease is expected at a February meeting.

• transferred ownership of four city vehicles to the Enumclaw Expo and Events Association. The nonprofit EEEA is charged with operating the Enumclaw Expo Center, responsible for the grounds and facilities. The four vehicles – three pickups and a dump truck – have been used at the Expo Center since before the EEEA took over.

The vehicles in question have been declared surplus and have relatively little value, the newest being a 2006 GMC pickup and the oldest a 1992 dump truck. The city estimated the total value of all four vehicles at less than $10,000.

• appointed citizens to a variety of city boards and commissions. Darlene Dihel was named to the Arts Commission; Barbara Braun, Cemetery Board; Steve Cadematori, Civil Service Commission; Shelley Hall, Design Review Board; and Jami Balint, Planning Commission.

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