Opinion

Readers’ input is welcomed here

Fans of newspapers – and there are still plenty of dedicated readers out there, despite warnings to the contrary – realize this is an industry in the midst of great upheaval.

Consensus can hurt promises

With the legislature now meeting in Olympia and Barack Obama preparing his inaugural address, now might be a good time to recall two epic misadventures that vividly illustrate how not to close deficits.

Weather dampens inauguration history

There’s enough inherent drama in next week’s presidential inauguration that you might think it wouldn’t be necessary for the TV news networks to hype it. But you’d be wrong. That’s just what they do.

Alive and kicking with local flavor

Fans of newspapers – and there are still plenty of dedicated readers out there, despite warnings to the contrary – realize this is an industry in the midst of great upheaval.

  • Jan 13, 2009

Change came quicker than some expected

Far back in the woebegone days of my childhood, small-town Enumclaw had a great deal of covert bigotry toward black people. It wasn’t out in the open because there weren’t any blacks around here but, make no mistake about it, the racist attitudes were surely there – as confirmed by the none-too-subtle, negative remarks made behind the back of my Hispanic classmate, Jim Morris.

  • Jan 13, 2009

Concensus can undermine faith and trust

With the Legislature now meeting in Olympia and Barack Obama preparing his inaugural address, now might be a good time to recall two epic misadventures that vividly illustrate how not to close deficits.

  • Jan 13, 2009

Pen paints colorful words

It is hard for my pen to create for you, the reader, what I get to see in person. A wisp of smoke, the frost on the ground and covering the lawns. Frozen droplets of morning dew, clinging to the leaves of the tall alder trees. Bushes with their heads bowed low from the heavy frost. Leaves of yellow, orange and rust lying in heaps under the great maple and oak trees, standing in and among the evergreen trees such as fir, cedar and others.

“Rich Like Them” provides wealth of motivation

“Rich Like Them” by Ryan D’Agostino, c.2008, Little, Brown, $25.99, 256 pages.

Sumner businesses can rely on each other

The start of a new year is like a clean slate. And now that last year is behind us, it seems our 2008 accomplishments set the bar for 2009. Whether it’s fundraising, new event development, downtown preservation efforts, or increasing membership, we are always looking to improve in each successive year. With all the new volunteers we have, I don’t anticipate that will be a problem this year.

Readers’ input is welcomed here

Fans of newspapers – and there are still plenty of dedicated readers out there, despite warnings to the contrary – realize this is an industry in the midst of great upheaval.

Consensus can hurt promises

With the legislature now meeting in Olympia and Barack Obama preparing his inaugural address, now might be a good time to recall two epic misadventures that vividly illustrate how not to close deficits.

Local – it’s what we’re all about

The dawn of a new year is filled with bright, shiny promise, bouyed by the potential for prosperity and world peace.

  • Jan 6, 2009

Ad slogans can leave an impression

I was at a convenience store the other day buying the usual – beef jerky and Mountain Dew – when I noticed the pen at the checkout counter. The storeowner had Scotch-taped a white plastic spoon to the pen, figuring that customers will be less likely to forgetfully leave with the pen after signing a check or credit card slip. (Unfortunately, the practice doesn’t always work. I know a guy whose glove box is filled with pens and white plastic spoons.)

Husky victory is just one prediction

Would anyone have predicted last January that the stock market would plunge from 13,000 to 8,500 by year’s end? That the Huskies would be the only major college football team to not win a game? That John McCain would be the Republican nominee for president, that his running mate would be the almost unknown governor of Alaska and that Barack Obama would be president? That more Americans would die violently in Chicago than in all of Iraq in 2008? That Washington Mutual, once as mighty a local institution as Safeco and Weyerhaeuser, would crash and burn and be picked up for pennies on the dollar by Chase?

  • Jan 6, 2009

Husky victory is just one prediction

Would anyone have predicted last January that the stock market would plunge from 13,000 to 8,500 by year’s end? That the Huskies would be the only major college football team to not win a game? That John McCain would be the Republican nominee for president, that his running mate would be the almost unknown governor of Alaska and that Barack Obama would be president? That more Americans would die violently in Chicago than in all of Iraq in 2008? That Washington Mutual, once as mighty a local institution as Safeco and Weyerhaeuser, would crash and burn and be picked up for pennies on the dollar by Chase?

  • Jan 6, 2009

A cold-morning sunrise

It was Friday morning, temp 26 degrees; cold? Oh yes, it’s cold. So I’m headed for the mountains? Why not – if it’s cold down there in the valley, then it’s bound to be really cold up on the mountain.

“Buffalo” a treat for those hunting a good read

“American Buffalo” by Steven Rinella, c.2008, Spiegel & Grau, $24.95, 278 pages, includes notes.

Sumner to host many downtown events

You don’t need a GPS tracking system to navigate through all the fun downtown events that are scheduled for 2009. That’s right. The new annual Downtown Event calendar is at the printers right now receiving the final graphic touches and will be available in the next week or two. Many of you already know that the best place to pick up a copy of the much sought after calendar that graces the front of many a Sumner refrigerator is at your local downtown merchants. Rumor has it that many families are reluctant to plan their vacations until they see the dates for the events so they don’t miss anything fun. Ha!

A promise to cover local stories

The dawn of a new year is filled with bright, shiny promise, bouyed by the potential for prosperity and world peace.

Husky win just one prediction

Would anyone have predicted last January that the stock market would plunge from 13,000 to 8,500 by year’s end? That the Huskies would be the only major college football team to not win a game? That John McCain would be the Republican nominee for president, that his running mate would be the almost unknown governor of Alaska and that Barack Obama would be president? That more Americans would die violently in Chicago than in all of Iraq in 2008? That Washington Mutual, once as mighty a local institution as Safeco and Weyerhaeuser, would crash and burn and be picked up for pennies on the dollar by Chase?