More reasons to vote no on Sound Transit | Letter to the Editor

A previous letter (Courier-Herald, Sept. 21) gave us an overview of the tax environment in the Washington State mentioning the upcoming ballot wherein Sound Transit is floating a $54 billion initiative to extend their train and transit system.

A previous letter (Courier-Herald, Sept. 21) gave us an overview of the tax environment in the Washington State mentioning the upcoming ballot wherein Sound Transit is floating a $54 billion initiative to extend their train and transit system.

Homeowners in particular need to be very wary of this proposal as ST has, for the first time, access to your property taxes. Property taxes have traditionally been used for local schools and firefighting. The ST tax provides little or no benefit to may local areas. Other taxes will increase to finance ST, sales tax, a proposed 50 percent ST increase and motor vehicle fees, a three-fold increase. It is important to understand that these are not temporary increases, they do not sunset at the end of this 25-year project. Our children and grandchildren will be paying for this project out to 2071. As with any public works project there has to be a cost vs. benefit factor. This proposal offers nothing close to reasonable.

Many of us have had occasion to ride a link or commuter train, work, Seahawks game, airport and maybe just because it’s there. The current network does a good job of covering the south Puget Sound corridor. ST runs a nice bus system transporting hundreds of thousands of riders annually. Entering into the light and commuter rail business has created a costly and inflexible system that serves a very small segment of daily commuters and has done nothing to limit the ever worsening traffic congestion. STs $$54 billion proposal represents two things, a massive debt with very little positive impact and diversion of tax dollars from desperately needed transit and road projects.

Tell ST no.

Doug Willrich

Bonney Lake

More in Letters to the Editor

It only matters how much you care about your community

A reader responds to an “divisive and inflammatory” Wally’s World column.

We must move away from identity politics

Mr. Trump recognized the legitimate concerns of the “working class” and socio-economic middle class which have born a disproportionate negative impact from many of Washington’s policies.

Deeply held religious beliefs do good in the world

It is truly disheartening to see the eagerness with which people jump on the bandwagon to Christian bash.

SPLC accurately labels hate organizations and people

The SPLC has received my support for many years and will continue to receive my support for their efforts to defend the civil rights of all persons.

Thank you for, Mount Peak Historical Fire Lookout Association supporters

Keep a lookout for future information during this fundraising phase.

Freedom of religions doesn’t mean imposing your beliefs on the public

To then allow any person or group to inflict its particular religious beliefs upon others would clearly deny our right to freely worship and follow our own beliefs

Businesses should serve the public equally

Many a war has started over “deeply held beliefs’ and religious convictions.

Editor failed to be a fair moderator

Instead of framing the issues and allowing the readers to “form their own opinions on the matters at hand,” the editor chose to apply superfluous labels.

“Deeply held beliefs” no excuse for discrimination

Is it not time that we recognize that “deeply held beliefs,” sometimes are simply wrong?

Southern Poverty Law Center no longer credible

The editor’s use of the SPLC in an opinion piece was flawed.

All encouraged to participate in this year’s National Night Out

This is a chance for neighbors to build neighborhood spirit.

Lindquist made our communities safer

He has a proven record of protecting seniors, locking up career criminals, and suing Big Pharma to recover money for taxpayers.