Giving thanks for our good fortune

The approaching Thanksgiving holiday, the state of the economy and a series of events that have occurred in the community and to folks I know, has made me reflective.

The approaching Thanksgiving holiday, the state of the economy and a series of events that have occurred in the community and to folks I know, has made me reflective.

Every day I thank God for the gifts he has given me. Rarely do I do this in public. A Courier-Herald column and then a posting on our Web site are pretty public, but it seems appropriate for the season and the times.

I am thankful my family has a roof over its head and food on its table. I know there are many families here, and around the world, that do not.

I am thankful my husband and I ≠have a job – a means to keep a roof over our heads and food on our table. I may not like my job all the time and I may think it should pay better, but I have one and I know right now many in the community and across the nation wish they did. That job comes with extras like health insurance and an optional retirement, something many dream they were offered. And I know still others are fretting that their job may suddenly disappear. I ask that I understand their situation, because I know it could easily be me in their shoes one day.

I hope that I am able to share my good fortune with those who are in need.

I am thankful for family and friends, and my big ol’ chocolate lab, who support me and keep me sane even when I am a butt-head or say and do things that are out of line. These are the people who love me unconditionally and I hope that I can return that love and be there for them in the same way.

I am thankful for my health, or my perceived health. There may be something sinister lurking inside, but right now it’s unknown and I feel good. I know so many, of all ages, who are coping with illness and disease and I am thankful I am well to help them and offer my assistance.

I am thankful we live in a community that rallies together. Time and time again I’ve been witness to the power of people who find strength in each other; people who put aside their differences for the common good of others and ideas.

I am thankful for babies, because to me they represent hope for the future. I hope they listen to the generations before them and learn from their history as they grow to be the leaders of tomorrow.

There are millions of other things that make me feel grateful. Some may seem silly, but they bring me comfort and others are serious and probably on the minds of many readers. It seems appropriate this Thanksgiving to not get swallowed up by the negatives in our lives or that’s happening around us, but concentrate on the positives – to reflect on the things that are good and that make us thankful.


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Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the state’s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at thebrunells@msn.com.
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