Dream growing in Buckley

A longtime dream has taken root and is sprouting in Buckley.

Rebecca Frisby

A longtime dream has taken root and is sprouting in Buckley.

Rececca Frisby has always loved tending to her garden and that passion led to her creating hanging baskets that were seen brightening the streets in front of Buckley businesses.

It kept her busy when customer demand had her putting together 75 brightly-colored baskets and things really took a turn when the customer count climbed to 150.

Finally, after five years in the basket business, the timing was right to dive headlong into the nursery business.

“It was my dream ever since we moved out here nine years ago,” Frisby said, strolling through the large, commercial greenhouse that dominates Frisby Farms Nursery and Gifts.

The new Buckley business, operated by Frisby and her husband Kevin, fronts the north side of Ryan Road, approximately a mile east of the state Route 410 intersection.

Frisby is a former real estate agent and when her husband retired in 2008 after 27 years as an air traffic controller, the seeds of the business were sown.

It didn’t come easily, with thousands of dollars expended in the permit process, the purchase of a 26-foot by 36-foot greenhouse – which initially twisted in the wind – and the necessary landscaping that comes with a commercial venture. But after a year of hammering out details, Frisby Farms opened for business May 1.

Customers can wander through rows of bedding plants, choose from tall trees ready to be planted or take home healthy tomato plants already 2 feet tall.

Behind the commercial greenhouse, there’s a small shed with garden-themed gifts and, out front are larger items for sale like picnic tables and eclectic yard art.

In addition, Frisby is happy to share her passion, and her knowledge – she’s a certified master gardener – with customers.

“I’m happy to give consultations,” she said, “and tell people where to plant things.”

A final offering has the Frisbys taking things one step further, providing landscaping services for those who want a good-looking yard without expending the effort to make it happen.

Frisby Farms Nursery and Gifts is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays.

The business can be reached by calling 360-829-0699.


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