Enumclaw-based Olson’s Meats and Smokehouse takes top honor again

Olson’s Meats and Smokehouse has continued its winning ways.

The Olson’s Meats crew displays the hardware earned during competition against processors from throughout the Pacific Northwest.

The Olson’s Meats crew displays the hardware earned during competition against processors from throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Olson’s Meats and Smokehouse has continued its winning ways.

The Enumclaw-based, family-owned and operated business recently brought home the Silver Platter Award, signifying its grand champion status following the annual competition staged by the Northwest Meat Processors Association.

The close-knit operation, owned by Gregory and Marcia Olson, has been around for a decade, serving customers from the same location west of town on state Route 164.

During judging at Oregon State University, the Enumclaw shop took grand champion honors for its pastrami, fermented summer sausage, nonfermented summer sausage, boneless ham and Louisiana hot links; reserve grand champion honors were received for Olson’s pepperoni and sweet Italian bulk sausage; and champion honors were earned for beef jerky its bone-in ham.

There were 135 entries in the competition, from markets in Washington, Oregon and Idaho.




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Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the state’s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at thebrunells@msn.com.
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